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1st Kawasaki Disease Parent Symposium in San Jose, CA

I have been asked to spread the word about a Kawasaki disease symposium that is happening in the Bay area.  It is being organized by the Kawasaki Disease Foundation, a US non-profit organization dedicated to Kawasaki disease issues.  The event will be hosted by KD specialists from Seattle,  WA.  This is a wonderful opportunity to have your questions answered by two of the leading physicians in the field and meet other parents who have been affected by Kawasaki disease.

Following is the basic info:

When: Saturday, August 25, 2012 from 1-4 P.M.

Where: Good Samaritan Hospital Auditorium
2425 Samaritan Drive
San Jose, CA 95124
(408) 559-2011

What: 
Join KD specialist, Sadeep Shrestha: Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, who will be talking about the Genetics of Kawasaki Disease.

And Dr Michael Portman: Professor, Attending Cardiologist and Director of Cardiology Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital, who will be speaking about the Paradigms of Kawasaki Disease.

Babysitting will be available.

You can register online at the Kawasaki Disease Foundation website: http://www.kdfoundation.org/index.php/component/chronoforms/?tmpl=component&chronoform=KDSymposiumSanJoseAug2012

You can also get more information on their Facebook event page.

Contact info: 

Vanessa Gutierrez
kawasakidisease2007@yahoo.com

Kate Davila
katedavila@yahoo.com

I am sure it will be a successful event and would love to hear back from any attendees about insights they gained while attending.

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